image hooke_r_micrographia_298
Image number: RS.9449
Credit: © The Royal Society
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White plume moth

Date

1665

Creator

Unknown, Engraver

After

Robert Hooke (1635-1703, British), Natural Philosopher

Object type

Library reference

RCN 45230

Material

Technique

Dimensions

height (print): 304mm
width (print): 184mm

Subject

Physics
   > Optics
      > Microscopy
Biology
   > Entomology

Content object

nature
   > animal
      > insect

Description

Microscopic study of a white plume moth pterophorus pentadactyla, showing its head, body, legs and wings outspread.

Inscribed above: ‘Schem XXX’

Written in the associated text: ‘all the Body, Legs, Horns and the Stalks of the Wings, were covered over with various kinds of curious white Feathers, which did, with handling or touching, easily rub off and fly about, in so much that looking on my Fingers…I found by my Microscope, that they were several of the small Feathers of this little creature’

Plate 30 from Robert Hooke’s Micrographia: or some physiological descriptions of minute bodies made by magnifying glasses with observations and inquiries thereupon (1665), the first fully-illustrated book on the topic of microscopy. In the preface Hooke asserts that he had discovered ‘a new visible World’.

Robert Hooke (1635-1703) British natural philosopher was a founding member of the Royal Society, elected in 1663. Before his career with the Royal Society, Hooke had been apprenticed to painter Peter Lely (1618-1680), where he learned to draw and paint. Though he did not engrave the images in Micrographia himself they were engraved after his illustrations.

Associated place

<The World>
   > Europe
      > United Kingdom